Chainstiching, start and stop method so it will not unravel.

Chainstiching, start and stop method so it will not unravel.

Chainstiching, start and stop method so it will not unravel.

First thing first, I never chainstich, coverstich or reverse coverstich unless there is fabric under the presser foot and the foot down. All most all machines were never made to stitch unless there is fabric machine. Unless you have a higher-end machine that in the manual states that you can.

I start by placing my fabric in the machine where I want the stitch to start, lower the presser foot, then hand crank one full stitch, then stitch my chainstitch, and end about 1 or 2 (I prefer the 2) stitches from the raw edge at the end.

Then I raise the presser foot, lift the front end of the presser foot, take a tool and pull the needle thread forward about 5 inches or 13cm, and cut the thread, then gently pull fabric back or slightly to the left and back pulling the needle thread through to the back of the fabric, pull back about 5 inches or 13cm, and cut the looper thread.

And you are done, the start of a chainstich usually self locks, and with this method, the end is now locked and neither end will unravel.

To clean up the stitch, I take a needle and thread the start needle thread to the back. And I tie off the stitches off at both ends.

Some advice, never yank or hard tug your fabric after you chainstich or serge, I know several if not most instructional videos they do that. There is no reason for that, and it is a good way to bend any of the mechanisms on or under the needle plate. Not to mention may bend a needle also.

Owning both the serger Singer Finishing Touch™ 14SH654, serger/coverstich combo Singer Professional 5 14T968DC, I am going to try to become super proficient and skilled with these two machines. I want to be the goto person for using both of them.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: