Mock reverse coverstich on fabric that has had sublimation printing. 

Mock reverse coverstich on fabric that has had sublimation printing. 

Sewing Methods, mock reverse coverstich on fabric that has had sublimation printing. 

Working on the mock reverse coverstitch, this time with some sport lyrca from SpoonFlower.  Got the fabric from Ebay, is it sublimation printing, which is printing on a white base fabric.  I have used some of this type of fabric in the past.   Not sure if is was from Spoonflowers Ebay account or a different vendor.

Not my favorite, if you have a dark pattern or print on the right side of the fabric, sometimes the white base fabric shows through.  Happens mostly at the seam when it pulls apart a bit and the threads pull open the fabric. Does the same when you topstitch with my mock reverse coverstitch. 

Did have to do a small change to my method, this fabric did not like a 1/4″ seam allowance, increased to 3/8″ to give a bit more fabric for better stitching.

Tried several methods, my first choice was stitch 52 on my machine (Brother CE1100).  Did ok, but it a lot stitches per cycle of stitch, and did pull in from the sides and caused a bit of the white to peek through. 

My second stitch was with the honeycomb stitch did a bit better.  This stitch has less pull from the edges. But still a tiny bit of white peeked through. 

The third was with the triple stitch stretch stitch, did the construction seam then a single row of topstitching, on each side of the seam.  Not as strong as a seam as the first two methods. Some showing of white in the top stitching, but there was very little in the seam.  This seam does not pull open very easy, due to the multiple threads in each stitch. 

Fourth and final testing for today was the little lightning bolt stretch stitch.  This stitch even without pulling shows the most white due to the little zigzag it does.  Then I topstitched with the same stitch, did a bit better there but still, a bit of the white peeks through. 

Printed stretch fabric that has had sublimation printing is always an issue due to the white base fabric.  I have not found anyone who prints on a black base.  My experience with the printing of paper it is very difficult to print on dark backgrounds.   

Any of these methods will work, from a few feet away, you will not notice the white that peeks through.  For a personal garment, this fabric is fine.  But if doing of a paying client don’t think this would be presentable. 

Roller or screen printed knits tend to let more of the fabric dyes or inks to penetrate better but are usually a thinner or lighter weight then fabric used in sublimation printing.  And is used on very large runs, so tends to be much cheaper, and is limited to what the manufacturer is selling, IE fabric on bolts at fabric store.  Almost impossible for a home sewist to get a custom order. 

Not to stray too far off from this post, this type of fabric (sublimated printed) does do much better in a serger, just use matching thread to the fabric print as close as possible.

 

My prefered stitch, #52 on my Brother CE1100.  A little bit of the white base fabric show through some of the topstitching.
My preferred stitch, #52 on my Brother CE1100. A little bit of the white base fabric shows through some of the topstitching.

 

This is the honeycomb stitch, a bit better, still some white shows through the stiching.
This is the honeycomb stitch, a bit better, still some white shows through the stitching.

 

This is using the triple stretch stitch.
This is using the triple stretch stitch.

 

Using the lighting bolt stretch stitch.
Using the lighting bolt stretch stitch.
Stitch #52 on the left most, Honeycomb in the middle, and triple stitch on the rights.
Stitch #52 on the left most, Honeycomb in the middle, and triple stitch on the rights.

 

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