Mock Reverse Coverstitch on home sewing machine with knit fabric.

Mock Reverse Coverstitch on home sewing machine with knit fabric.

Sewing Method, Mock Reverse Coverstitch on a home sewing machine with knit fabric.

A question that gets asked almost every day on one or another of the sewing groups on Facebook, is How can I do this stitch (reverse coverstich) on my home sewing machine.

Three thread coverstich
Three thread coverstich. showing the underside, aka Reverse Coverstich.

Then about 10 replies, it’s a reverse coverstich, you can not do that on a home sewing machine, you need a coverstich machine.

I say you can come close to the look with a bit of technique and a method or two.  The look of the reverse side of the cover stitch, on knit fabric.

Most modern computerized sewing machines with many decorative stitches. Adjust the width and length of the stitch you can get something that comes close to the look of an actual reverser coverstich.

On my inexpensive Walmart Brother Project Runway CE1100 (bought on sale for about $100). The best choice is stitch number 52, with a stitch length of 2mm and width of 7mm, using a basic cone thread 100% poly.

Stitch I use for the mock reverse coverstitch. It is an un-named stich on my Brother home sewing machine.
Stitch I use for the mock reverse coverstitch. It is an un-named stitch on my Brother home sewing machine.

Every machine make and model is different you may get similar results using similar stitch and setting, but likely will have to tweak them a bit for best results with your machine.

First, do a construction seam as usual, but with a scant 1/4″ or 5mm seam allowance.  Then flip to the right side to topstitch with the decorative stitch.  I finger press open the seam on the wrong side before I start stitching.

Doing the scant 1/4″ or 5mm seam allowance, allows the 7mm wide stitch to catch all of the raw edges of the fabric on the wrong side, giving a clean look to the inside of the garment.

I did this on some cotton/spandex, nylon/spandex and poly/spandex, worked well on each, had to reduce the tension down to one on some of the lighter weight fabrics. and this stitch does have some stretch to it.  You will need to check how your machine does these stitches to see if the amount of stretch will work your fabric and pattern.

Moch Reverse coverstich, done on home sewing machine.
Moch Reverse coverstich, done on home sewing machine.  Using the scant 1/4″ or 5mm seam allowance.
Moch Reverse coverstich, done on home sewing machine. Showing right and wrong sides, used a 5/8" or 1.5cm seam allowance.
Moch Reverse coverstich, done on home sewing machine. Showing right and wrong sides, used a 5/8″ or 1.5cm seam allowance.
Moch Reverse coverstich, done on home sewing machine. Showing right and wrong sides, used a contrast fabric/thread does not come out as well.
Moch Reverse coverstich, done on home sewing machine. Showing right and wrong sides, used a contrast fabric/thread does not come out as well.

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